Future Cars 2016 & Beyond

Future Cars 2016 – Everyone’s always waiting for the new car model and every auto maker thinks it has the best one. With several years of strong growth after the recession, car companies are investing in more new models in more segments than at any time in recent history. In this post, we’ll show you what auto makers are planning to meet or beat your expectations with and what they think you’ll want after that.

2016 Chevrolet Camaro

What’s Now: Sports Cars

What’s New: A platform, a turbocharged four-cylinder engine, and the best interior any Camaro has ever seen. Chevy promises 270 hp in its 2.0-liter, turbocharged inline-four, 335 hp in its 3.6-liter, direct-injection V-6, and 455 hp from the 6.2-liter, direct-injection V-8. The new Alpha platform, the same one that underpins the Cadillac ATS, is 28 percent stiffer than the old Zeta platform. There are also significant suspension upgrades and a well-laid-out interior with vastly better materials.

What’s Not: Exterior styling, though new, undergoes an evolutionary change instead of a radical makeover.

When: Winter 2015

How Much: $24,000 (est)

 

2017 Audi R8

What’s Now: Sports Cars

What’s New: Its structure, design, and power train configurations. Designers retouched every exterior panel and interior panel to create an even more avant-garde exotic car experience. Audi’s 5.2-liter V-10, the sole engine, is available in 532- or 602-hp tunes and with a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox. Expect a twin-turbo V-8 option later. Engineers cut 110 pounds from its curb weight and upped torsional rigidity by 40 percent, allowing it to sprint to 62 mph in just 3.2 seconds and top out at 205 mph.

What’s Not: A cool factor that’s good enough for Ironman himself.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $150,000 (est)

 

2016 Lotus Evora 400

What’s Now: Sports Cars

What’s New: It’s the fastest and most powerful production Lotus ever. A 3.5-liter, supercharged V-6 engine produces 400 hp and helps the car achieve a 0-60 time of 4.1 seconds, Lotus estimates. More than two-thirds of the car is completely new. A new aluminum chassis and composite body shed some 50 pounds from the previous Evora

What’s Not: It’s still lightweight.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $90,000 (est)

 

2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

What’s Now: Sports Car

 

What’s New: Its engine. Thanks to a 3.8-liter flat-six sourced from the 911 Carrera S, the Boxster Spyder makes 375 hp and is estimated to run from 0 to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds. It’s the most powerful Boxster yet and will only be offered with a six-speed manual transmission. Its brakes come from the 911 Carrera, but front and rear fascias are similar to the Cayman GT4.

What’s Not: The hand-folded soft top remains, and most creature comforts are still available.

When: Summer 2015

How Much: $83,095

Subaru BRZ tuned by STI

What’s Now: Sports Car

 

What’s New: It won’t be called BRZ STI but will have a name that implies Subaru’s rally/racing gods have blessed this special model. Upgrades will include various body stiffeners and chassis braces to improve both steering response and ride comfort, plus the standard tuner fare: higher-efficiency air intakes and exhaust, Brembo brakes, slick aero, a rear deck spoiler, and upsized wheels and tires.

What’s Not: The engine. Despite pleas from the enthusiasts around the world, Subaru is not turbocharging the standard BRZ’s 200-hp, 2.0-liter flat-four. Why? Top execs say, “Please, enjoy the fine handling and balance. Arigato.”

When: Summer 2016

How Much: $35,000 (est)

2016 Chevrolet Malibu

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: Chevrolet rolls out a new midsize sedan that should prove much more competitive than the previous model. It arrives with a host of technologies, including pedestrian detection and a system that tracks a young driver’s habits. It has a new interior and a choice of 1.5-liter or 2.0-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engines. It will be lighter than the outgoing model while adding 3.6 inches to its wheelbase. There will also be a gas-electric hybrid that should get 48 mpg city.

What’s Not: The Malibu’s new exterior follows the likes of the aero-slick Ford Fusion,Chrysler 200, and Hyundai Sonata. It’s new, but certainly not breaking new ground.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $23,000 (est)

 

2016 Ford Taurus

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: The full-size Ford Taurus will finally offer up full-size sedan cabin space when the new model hits our shores. With the old Taurus offering about the same interior space as the midsize Fusion, the new Taurus gets a 3.2-inch wheelbase stretch, which allows Ford engineers to increase rear seat legroom and comfort. Other changes include an upscale exterior design and more luxurious interior trim.

What’s Not: The 2.0-liter, turbo inline-four from the old car likely carries over as the base engine. Although that engine is great in some smaller Ford products, the Taurus’ larger mass might prove to be too much for it to overcome. Engine options should include twin-turbo V-6s in 2.7- and 3.5-liter displacements.

When: Spring 2016

How Much: $30,000 (est)

 

2016 Chevrolet Spark

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: The Spark gets bigger, lower, and more powerful in its next generation. The Spark replaces its 1.2-liter engine with a 98-hp, 1.4-liter four-cylinder. The exterior has been smoothed out, and the slightly bigger interior has seen an upgrade in materials. Although the Spark remains a minor success in the U.S., Chevy has big plans for it overseas; it’s sold in more than 40 countries.

What’s Not: Don’t expect a big jump in fuel economy. The current model gets up to 31/39 mpg city/highway, and the new Spark will likely add only a mile or two.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $13,000 (est)

 

2016 Kia Optima

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: Lots of the hardware. A new engine comes in the form of a 1.6-liter turbo-four that makes 178 hp. This comes paired with a new seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The chassis is longer, wider, and stiffer, and there’s more room inside to stretch thanks to the slightly longer wheelbase. Bi-function HID headlights and 360-degree camera view are new features.

What’s Not: The exterior design was updated, but it’s so subtle you can’t really tell. The 185-hp, 2.4-liter, GDI inline-four and 247-hp, 2.0-liter, GDI turbo engines carry over from last year, though they’ve been retuned for fuel economy and better performance (but less power).

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $23,500 (est)

2016 Nissan Maxima

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: The performance-oriented Maxima is now longer, lower, and lighter by 82 pounds thanks to a new chassis. A drive mode selector that adjusts the steering, throttle response, and transmission tuning is new, as is a nicer interior with a canted center stack and D-shaped steering wheel. Lots of curves, lines, and angles make this Maxima look like the “4DSC” it claims to be.

What’s Not: The 3.5-liter V-6, though it’s been tweaked to make 10 extra horses for a total of 300 hp. The CVT also stays, but it too was reworked to feel sportier and crank out more MPGs.

When: Summer 2015

How Much: $33,235

2016 Scion iA

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: The Scion iA is all-new for the 2016 model year and will be the first sedan offered by Toyota’s youth-oriented brand. It will be built on the same platform as the 2016 Mazda2 and share design elements inside and out. Power will come from a naturally aspirated, direct-injected, 1.5-liter inline-four that will deliver 106 hp and 103 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard, but customers can opt for the six-speed automatic with Sport mode. Scion will also offer an array of dealer-installed accessories and customization options.

What’s Not: The iA is all-new to the Scion lineup.

When: September 2015

How Much: $16,000 (est)

2016 Scion iM

What’s Now: Family Cars

What’s New: Along with the iA sedan, Scion’s iM hatchback represents the first wave of fresh product for Toyota’s struggling subset. The iM is based on the JDM Toyota Auris, a four-door hatch that just got refreshed with more active safety, minor styling tweaks inside and out, and an all-new 1.2-liter, turbocharged inline-four good for 114 horsepower and 136 lb-ft of torque. Four-wheel disc brakes and dual-zone auto climate control are standard, and even the side mirrors are power-folding. We loved the 1.2 Auris when we sampled it in Japan, but, alas, the U.S.-spec iM won’t get the tiny turbo. At least it’ll offer a six-speed manual.

What’s Not: The iM’s 137-hp, 126-lb-ft, 1.8-liter inline-four. That comes courtesy of the Corolla LE Eco.

When: September 2015

How Much: $20,000 (est)

 

2016 Lexus ES

What’s Now: Luxury Cars

What’s New: Its entire exterior. LED headlights accentuate the nose’s familial spindle grille, and 17-inch wheels continue the sheetmetal’s sleeker vibe. Four new exterior paints and four different seat colors broaden the ES’ palette. The available bamboo trim now has a matte finish. The interior also has higher-quality surfaces, a sportier three-spoke steering wheel, and increased sound-deadening materials. Comfort benefits from the stiffer unibody.

What’s Not: The 350’s 268-hp, 3.5-liter V-6 and the 300h’s 156-hp, 2.5-liter I-4 with a 141-hp electric motor remain the same.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $39,000 (est)

2016 Jaguar XF

What’s Now: Luxury Cars

What’s New: In addition to new interior and exterior styling, the XF gets a 2-inch longer wheelbase but still loses up to 265 pounds thanks to a mostly aluminum structure. An updated all-wheel-drive system is lighter and more efficient, and the body is more aerodynamic. Inside, it features a vastly improved touchscreen and entertainment/information display.

What’s Not: 20 percent of the parts carry over or are borrowed from the XE and F-Type. Engines are also borrowed, including a supercharged V-6 at launch and a turbocharged inline-four down the line. Later, it will become Jag’s first diesel model in the U.S.

When: Winter 2015

How Much: $50,000-$100,000

2016 Cadillac CT6

What’s Now: Luxury Cars

What’s New: Virtually everything. What isn’t new (hi, CUE) has been substantially improved. What is the CT6? Cadillac’s entry to the S-Class,
7 Series, Audi A8, Jaguar XJ, and Lexus LS party. One key differentiator is weight, as the CT6’s chassis is made from 13 distinct metals and alloys and is said to weigh up to 300 pounds less than its competition. AWD, all-wheel steering, two new engines, and a plug-in hybrid version with 432 lb-ft of torque are all part of the mix.

What’s Not: The 2.0-liter I-4 and suboptimal leather.

When: Late 2015

How Much: $75,000 (est)

 

Tesla Model S 70D

What’s Now: Luxury Cars

What’s New: The dual-motor 70D replaces the old single-motor 60-kW-hr sedan as the base Tesla Model S. The car gets a 70-kW-hr battery pack, dual-motor AWD, and a host of standard features not found on the previous base car. The new specs allow for a 240-mile range, Supercharger capability, and a max output of 329 hp. Tesla estimates the car can hit 60 mph in 5.2 seconds with top speed capped at 140 mph.

What’s Not: Design. The 70D is still the same Model S we’ve come to know over the past few years. Styling changes inside and out, if any, are minimal.

When: Now

How Much: $76,200

 

Hyundai Tucson

What’s Now: SUVs

 

What’s New: The Tucson has been completely redesigned and boasts a new powertrain option. A 1.6-liter turbo-four rated at 175 hp and 195 lb-ft of torque and paired to a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic is available on higher trim levels. The new front fascia largely mimics the Santa Fe’s, and the new interior boasts nicer materials and more tech.

What’s Not: The 164-hp, 2.0-liter inline-four and six-speed auto carry over for the base model.

When: Summer 2015

How Much: $23,000 (est)

 

Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class

What’s Now: SUVs

What’s New: Everything. As part of Mercedes-Benz’s new naming scheme, the GLK is now called the GLC, and with the name change comes an all-new model. The GLC borrows heavily from its C-Class stablemate, with similar styling and powertrains mimicking its sedan counterpart. Available with rear- or all-wheel drive, the GLC300 will be powered by a 2.0-liter turbo-four making around 250 hp and 275 lb-ft. The GLC will be bigger than the GLK it replaces, allowing breathing room for the smaller GLA and providing its buyers with a more comfortable, luxurious cabin.

What’s Not: We have to wait another year for the high-zoot GLC63 AMG.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $40,000 (est)

 

Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class

What’s Now: SUVs

What’s New: For starters, the name. The GLE is the new ML, with new styling and two new variants. The GLE550e is the brand’s first SUV/crossover with a plug-in hybrid powertrain. It uses a direct-injection V-6 and electric motor to produce a total of 436 hp. A racier GLE63 AMG S with 577 hp is also brand-new, as is the GLE Coupe.

What’s Not: The twin-turbo diesel I-4 from the ML250 BlueTec, the V-6 from the ML350, and the twin-turbo V-6 from the ML400. The seven-speed auto stays, but a nine-speed comes in 2017.

When: August 2015, with the Coupe following in the fall

How Much: $52,000 (est); Coupe $66,000 (est)

 

2016 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid

What’s Now: SUVs

What’s New: The RAV4 Hybrid is completely new for 2016. Specific powertrain details have not yet been released, but Toyota says the RAV4 Hybrid will offer more power than the traditional RAV4. It comes with AWD and will be available in two premium-oriented trim levels: XLE and Limited.

What’s Not: The entire RAV4 lineup is simply refreshed for 2016. Although some design changes have been made, expect the model to look a lot like the previous version.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $30,000 (est)

 

Lexus RX

What’s Now: SUVs

What’s New: Lexus’ best-selling RX gets new sheetmetal, an upgraded interior, and revised engines for the 2016 model year. The edgiest RX yet, the bigger crossover now sports Lexus’ controversial styling outside and an LFA-inspired interior. Powertrains are updated, with the RX 350’s 3.5-liter V-6 now making 300 hp, and the RX 450h’s hybrid system also now makes 300 hp. All-wheel drive, an eight-speed automatic, and the sporty F Sport package are available across the board.

What’s Not: The Lexus signature spindle grille, which is more prominent than before and takes on a cowcatcher look.

When: Fall 2015

How Much: $42,000 (est)

 

BMW 7 Series

What’s Next: Luxury Cars

 

What’s New: Everything, especially the mixed-material unibody, which pioneers the use of 16 carbon-fiber structural bits bonded and/or riveted to the steel and aluminum safety cage, helping the car shed 300 pounds. The entry-level TwinPower gasoline inline-six upgrades to B-engine architecture, and a plug-in hybrid will be offered. Four-corner air suspension is standard, and a new “adaptive” driving mode tailors comfort and sportiness to suit driver behavior. Inside, the iDrive system incorporates a tablet-like touchscreen, more conversational voice commands, and even rudimentary gesture controls.

What’s Not: The eight-speed automatic and other engine choices will likely represent refinements of the current generation’s offerings.

When: November 2015

How Much: $75,000-$145,000 (est)

Infiniti Q30

Wha’ts Next: Luxury Cars

infiniti_q30

What’s New: Infiniti’s all-new compact Q30 slots beneath the Q50 sedan. Along with the QX30 crossover, the Q30 will use a platform derived from Mercedes’ MFA architecture, which underpins the CLA and GLA. The hatchback is also expected to get a Mercedes-developed, turbocharged, 2.0-liter inline-four and will be built at Nissan’s Sunderland, U.K., plant.

What’s Not: The hatchback will be all-new, but the sheetmetal should look very much like the concept shown at the Frankfurt show in 2013.

When: Spring 2016

How Much: $30,000 (est)

 

Hyundai Santa Cruz

What’s Next: Trucks

What’s New: The Hyundai Santa Cruz crossover truck is an all-new addition to the automaker’s lineup. This segment-crossing model features an interesting Subaru Brat-like appearance with its small truck bed and snug cabin. The Santa Cruz will be powered by a 2.0-liter, turbodiesel inline-four delivering 190 hp and 300 lb-ft of torque, and mpg is estimated in the high 30s. With its unique looks and smaller size, it might just catch the attention of those under 30 looking for more utility.

What’s Not: The Santa Cruz is new to the Hyundai lineup.

When: Spring 2016 (est)

How Much: $25,000 (est)

 

Honda Ridgeline

What’s Next: Trucks

2016-Honda-Ridgeline

What’s New: Despite being based on the Honda Pilot SUV’s unit-body chassis, the upcoming second-generation Honda Ridgeline pickup is expected to be more trucklike. Power is expected to come from the redesigned 2016 Pilot’s revised 280-hp, 260 lb-ft, 3.5-liter V-6 mated to either a six-speed or nine-speed auto. The Pilot’s available Intelligent Variable Torque Management AWD system will likely be offered. The system features selectable terrain modes including Normal, Mud, Sand, and Snow, and the standard front-drive version offers Normal and Snow modes.

What’s Not: The Ridgeline will be a virtually all-new model.

When: Summer or Fall 2015

How Much: $30,000 (est)

 

Nissan Frontier/Navara

What’s Next: Trucks

What’s New: The global Nissan NP300 Navara shown last summer could hint at the next Frontier pickup for the U.S. Although the global pickup’s 2.5-liter, inline-four gas engine could carry over, we expect the U.S. model to get a V-6 and possibly the 2.8-liter Cummins turbodiesel inline-four from the Nissan Frontier Diesel Runner concept. A six-speed manual or seven-speed auto are available on the Navara. Global models will be available with three cab styles, in two- or four-wheel-drive, and with rear leaf springs or a five-link rear suspension.

What’s Not: The Frontier/Navara will be virtually all-new.

When: Fall 2016 (est)

How Much: $19,000 (est)

 

Mercedes-Benz pickup truck

What’s Next: Trucks

What’s New: Benz has plenty of SUVs and commercial trucks in its arsenal, but it doesn’t yet have a midsize pickup. That will change in 2020 when the automaker rolls out a new pickup truck produced in partnership with Nissan. Specs have yet to be finalized. The truck is confirmed for Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia, but the U.S. is still up in the air—a decision will be made by the end of 2015.

What’s Not: The platform, which is mostly based on the Nissan NP300 (Frontier and Navara).

When: 2020

How Much: $45,000 (est)

 

Cadillac XT5

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

What’s New: Expected to be called the Cadillac XT5, the replacement for the Cadillac SRX crossover will be built on GM’s all-new Chi platform, which is rumored to be available in short- and long-wheelbase variants with seating for five or seven passengers. Expected powertrain options include GM’s turbo, 2.0-liter inline-four, a revamped 3.6-liter V-6, and a new 3.0-liter, turbo V-6. A new nine-speed automatic transmission is possible. The new chassis could also underpin the next Buick Enclave,Chevrolet Traverse, and GMC Acadia.

What’s Not: Nothing. This one’s all-new.

When: Fall 2016

How Much: $40,000 (est)

 

Nissan Rogue Hybrid

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

What’s New: The powertrain. The new JDM X-Trail Hybrid (Rogue Hybrid for the U.S.) uses a special 2.0-liter, 145-hp, 153-lb-ft inline-four paired with a 30-hp, 118-lb-ft electric motor and a CVT. The result is a claim of “more torque than a 2.5-liter gasoline engine in all speed ranges” combined with fuel economy of 20.6 km/l, or north of 40 mpg. Thanks to Nissan’s “one-motor, two-clutch parallel hybrid system,” the X-Trail Hybrid can theoretically operate in EV mode under most driving conditions, except when the driver is aggressively engaging the throttle. Available in two- and four-wheel-drive variants, the X-Trail HEV comes standard with two-row seating and Forward Emergency Braking.

What’s Not: The styling. The X-Trail Hybrid’s only exterior differentiators are Pure Drive Hybrid badges on the front doors and rear hatch.

When: 2017

How Much: $26,000 (est)

 

Volkswagen Tiguan

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

2016-VW-Tiguan-front-view

What’s New: The next-gen global Tiguan is expected to add 2.2 inches to its overall length, with a long-wheelbase version growing even more to 184.6 inches. Our intel suggests that the U.S. will only get the long-wheelbase, three-row variant, as that’s what dealers have been clamoring for. The CUV will be built at VW’s plant in Puebla, Mexico, which could help lower the model’s cost. As it will share its MQB platform with the Golf, the Tiguan should get many of the same engine options, including a turbocharged, 1.8-liter inline-four and the latest iteration of the turbo 2.0-liter.

What’s Not: The model will be all-new, as it needs to be in order to improve sales.

When: Spring 2017

How Much: $27,000 (est)

Chrysler Town & Country

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

 

What’s New: The next-gen Chrysler Town & Country will feature a plug-in hybrid variant based on a new front-wheel-drive platform. Power for the hybrid comes via a 3.6-liter Pentastar engine paired with a two-mode hybrid transmission and liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery. It will deliver 290 hp and a range of around 700 miles. New styling brings the minivan into the modern era, but it will retain that classic two-box design.

What’s Not: Other than the hybrid, we expect the powertrain lineup to carry over.

When: Fall 2015 (est)

How Much: $30,000 (est)

 

Range Rover Evoque Convertible

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

What’s New: The convertible Evoque is an all-new model. Range Rover has kept mum on the details, but we’ve seen early prototypes with a black soft-top roof.

What’s Not: Other than the closing roof, we expect the Evoque convertible will look essentially the same as the regular model. It should also offer the same basic set of features and equipment.

When: No word on a specific timeline for the U.S., but Range Rover says the model will come to market by 2016.

How Much: $50,000 (est)

 

Rolls-Royce Cullinan (SUV)

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

What’s New: Everything. Rolls-Royce is making an SUV. An aluminum-intensive, go-anywhere SUV. Only it’s not being called an SUV. It’s a “high-bodied car.” Because Rolls-Royce. The AWD system will proliferate its way throughout the entire RR lineup. In fact, the structure will most likely underpin all future vehicles, including the mighty Phantom. Will an SUV hurt the brand’s hard-earned prestige? Not even a little.

What’s Not: The engine will be the same 6.6-liter, twin-turbo V-12 currently doing duty in the Ghost and the Wraith.

When: 2017

How Much: $400,000 (est)

Infiniti QX30

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

What’s New: It’s the brand’s first entry into the hot premium compact crossover segment and one of the first to use Mercedes-Benz’s MFA platform. It checks off all the boxes that Gen X/Y buyers will love: provocative design lines, a powerful stance, a tech-laden cockpit with tall seating positions, and a peppy 300-plus-hp, 2.0-liter, turbocharged, and direct-injected four-cylinder with a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. Its smallish dimensions (very similar to those of the Benz GLA) will strike a chord with city dwellers.

What’s Not: Its Q30 physique is all too familiar.

When: Spring 2016

How Much: $35,000 (est)

 

Bentley Bentayga

What’s Next: Vans + SUVs

Bentley-Bentayga-Front

 

What’s New: Bentley’s first production SUV will be a toned-down version of the controversial EXP 9 F Concept and look a bit more like the Flying Spur. Also more like the Flying Spur will be the interior, which will be an update of that sedan’s interior design rather than the concept’s big rethink. The all-wheel-drive system will be recalibrated to offer better off-road capability.

What’s Not: It shares the same underpinnings as the new Audi Q7 and the same engines as other Bentleys: a next-generation twin-turbo W-12 at launch and a twin-turbo V-8 down the line. A plug-in hybrid will come eventually.

When: September 2015

How Much: $200,000 (est)

So now if you looking to Buy a New car, its time to sell your old car and the best place to, Buy and Sell Your New or Used Cars in Australia is www.austree.com.au Australia’s Free Leading Classified website.

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